mccormick


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The War for Late Night by Bill Carter

Late night television is very interesting. Late night comedians are all very skilled in the art of satire. Each one – in his own way – pokes fun at modern culture, exposing the ridiculousness of it all. Letterman. Leno. O’Brien. Stewart. Colbert. Fallon. Ferguson. They do it so easily. (Sorry I have never really gotten into Kimmel, I know he’s funny but I have never watched his show regularly and I don’t include Carson Daly).

Late night television acts like it is outside our culture looking in, but in reality it is in the very fabric of our lives. So it is very interesting when late night television becomes the news instead of mocking the news.

I am a Conan O’Brien fan. I have watched him since the beginning of his days at Late Night on NBC. I was thrilled to see him move up as the host of the Tonight Show, and I was disappointed when he was "forced" out of his dream.

"The War for Late Night" does a great describing all sides of the battle for the Tonight Show. Though I still feel like Leno looks like an emotionless bully, you do sympathize with everyone's situation. It was a lose-lose scenario for Conan and Jay. NBC had pushed everyone into a corner, including themselves. Someone had to go.