mccormick


bookshelf

The Unwritten Rules of Baseball by Paul Dickson

My entire childhood was dedicated to baseball. I spent hours at practice, hours in the backyard with the pitch back, and hours in front of the television watching ESPN. It was my life. Unfortunately, like most kids, I had to grow up and realize the dream of being the starting catcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers had faded away. But the love of the game did not die.

It is the minute details, the small intricacies, the strange oddities, the weird obscurities, and so on that make baseball a beautiful game. There are countless documentaries, books, and memoirs about baseball because they are countless aspects to the game.

I did not expect a lot from this book. I knew it was going to be a lot of overused and tired anecdotes I have already heard. I was hoping for some newer insights from modern broadcasters, writers, and players. Unfortunately, the book is exactly what I feared.  I feel like ninety percent of this book was written by Joe Garagiola, since the majority of this book quotes or references Garagiola’s Baseball is a Funny Game.

The biggest takeaway from this book: find Joe Garagiola’s book.