mccormick


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Supernormal by Meg Jay

When you are a kid, it’s hard to understand what is normal. One moment I thought everything my family did was normal and everyone else was different. Then I became a teenager and I began to think everything my family did was weird and everyone else was normal. Later, in college, I began to understand that ‘normal’ is totally subjective and families are unique.

However, I soon learned that I grew up privileged. My family did not have a nice house and we had never had new cars, but I did have safety, stability, and love. I never worried where my next meal was. I never feared that my dad or mom wouldn’t show up. And despite my teenage angst, I always knew they were there for me.

Safety, stability, and love are not certainties in life. Many children grow up drenched in fear. They fear a sibling will assault them. They don’t know if a parent is coming home sober, drunk, or not at all. They worry if there will be enough money for food tomorrow. I have never had these fears, and I am very grateful.

My biggest fear now is not being the best husband and father I can be. If you read this book, you will be distraught. If you are like me, you will shake your head in disgust wondering how anyone could survive such a horrible childhood, let one thrive into adulthood.

I picked up this book because I enjoyed Jay’s previous. I appreciate her mix of intellect and emotions. She is very smart and very personable. I don’t know who I would recommend this book to, I guess anyone interested in child development.

All in all, this a great read.