mccormick


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The Physics of Everyday Things by James Kakalios

Technology has changed so much in the past century. In such a small span of history, we have moved from a mostly agrarian society to a society of futuristic devices. I am even amazed at how much technology has changed in my lifetime: televisions are unbelievably thin, phones are getting smaller yet exponentially more powerful, the computer I type sits lightly on a table able to transported anywhere at a moment’s notice.

With all these sudden progressions in technology, it is no surprise that we as consumers literally have no clue how anything works. Things change so fast that we do not have the time to stop and understand how our gizmos function. I consider myself a smart man but I don’t have the slightest clue how my watch works (yes, I have a watch).

This is where The Physics of Everyday Things comes in. This quick and easy read follows a man through an ordinary day and the technology he interacts with throughout the day. Almost like your favorite science teacher back in school, the author effortlessly describes how each item works using a rare combination of scientific knowledge and plain English.

Simply put, if you enjoy learning, you will love this book. It is a fun read. Now, this does not mean you will be smart and understand everything. I still do not comprehend how x-rays really work, but I do have a better understanding of the concept…I think.

*I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review