mccormick


bookshelf

Letterman by Jason Zinoman

Johnny Carson was a force that knew no bounds. He was a celebrity among celebrities. Carson’s Tonight Show was the pinnacle of entertainment. Unfortunately for me, I grew up in the post-Carson era. During my younger days, I admired Jay Leno. His rumor was topical and straightforward. I even remember watching the infamous Hugh Grant interview which today is considered the turning point in the late night wars.

I remember being a kid and not really understanding the appeal of David Letterman. His show was silly but the silliness was so rampant it was borderline obnoxious. It took a few years to finally understand the joke. The Late Show felt like a show within a show. It was like a giant inside joke.

As time wore on, it was interesting to see David Letterman become the de facto ambassador for funny. I was glued to his show after 9/11, after his heart surgery, and after the birth of his son. Letterman has the incredible ability to be serious and silly at the same time. He never makes light of a serious situation but he never takes himself too seriously.

In this book, you get to see the evolution of David Letterman as an entertainer. You don’t really get to see the personal side of Letterman (I am not even sure there is a personal side of Letterman). You will read about his college days, his weatherman days, his morning talk show and of course the two late night shows that made him a household name.

This book was very interesting and a definite recommend. Many of the stories and anecdotes came straight from source. This book is real and authentic.

At the conclusion I came to a realization: between the two, Leno is probably the better friend, but Letterman is the better entertainer.