mccormick


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Humble Pi by Matt Parker

Math is hard, there is no doubt about it. At first, math seems so understandable; numbers seem so real and concrete. But the more you dive into the pool of mathematics, you begin the notice you are swimming in a sea of concepts and abstractions.

I found math so confusing because no one could explain its relevance. Though I must admit, many of the things I learned in high school seem irrelevant now. (I’m looking at you Jane Eyre).

However, I don’t blame math. I blame math teachers. Knowing how to solve for ‘x’ is much different than understanding why we solve for ‘x’. So when you combine a teacher that cannot teach and a student that does not want to learn, education does not happen.

Over the past few years, I have picked up a few books that help shine a golden light on the fantastic world of mathematics. Humble Pi is another fantastic volume. Humble Pi focuses on (mostly) hilarious errors in the real world. Most of the errors seem to be computer-based, or better yet, Microsoft Excel-based.

From calendars to gears to bridges, the book covers a vast array of topics. Math simply describes the world we live in, the world we create, and the chaos that ensues. This book simply and enjoyable captures it for you.

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